close

LifeStyle

Master Class: Duane DaRock by DJ Layne Luv

Duane DaRock Long Way

Napoleon Hill goes on record with his book Think And Grow Rich telling the reader the very day he was sent on a mission to seek out the most successful people in the nation at that time, and develop a formula for how they became that way. The proposition was set by steel giant Andrew Carnegie. The two things I took from that fateful encounter is that successful men act quickly and change their minds slowly. 2nd, is belief,  will take you further than you can ever imagine. My point is, had Napoleon Hill let the knock of opportunity pass him by, by not recognizing a jewel (opportunity) handed to him from greatness, he might have robbed the world of some of the greatest entrepreneurs of our time inspired by his book. In July of 2017, in a conference room in Raleigh North Carolina, filled with DJ’s and radio personalities, I also felt the knock of opportunity when I heard the story of Duane DaRock…as told by Duane DaRock, and my journey has not been the same since. When he told the story of being homeless, I was at the time on the verge of being homeless and I didn’t know how I was going to get to North Carolina, let alone eat while I was down there. But one week before his breaking point…his life changed. One chance meeting with a legendary rapper solidified his place in music history. Ladies and Gentleman… Legendary Producer Duane DaRock.

SO: Mr. DaRock, so glad you could join Straight Official today. When you spoke at the Fleet Music Conference this past summer, you had something different to say vs, just talking about the music business itself, you wanted to drive home positive energy and vibrations. What made those things the forefront of your message?

DD: Well I’ve known about the power of vibration since I was 4 years old and the gift that came with that was being in tune with the vibrations of the universe and whatever you think about you bring about. The game changer for me was when my grandfather died when I was 12, that’s when I jumped in the music business which makes 32 years being in the music game. I will solely accredit the things I’ve accomplished in this business based on it being all about positive energy, good vibrations.

SO: So where did determination play a factor in your will to make it in the music business?

DD: Like I said I knew at the age of 12 what I wanted to do, so I let nothing or no one take me off of that path. So in 93′ I started producing records with the help of a man by the name of Steven Brown. He was a jazz musician. What happened was, I couldn’t find anyone to make beats for me being that I was from the Boston area. So I learned what I could until eventually I became self contained until the fateful day I met Big Daddy Kane. From there I started producing beats for Digable Planets, Kool Moe Dee, Rakim, LL Cool J and the list goes on.

SO: I know the story , but for those that need to hear this, tell the inspiring story of how you met Big Daddy Kane.

DD: Ok so I was homeless. My girl kicked me out and I was bouncing from place to place and I was starving. I was starving to the point my homie said I needed to go get some food assistance. I got all the way there and something came over me and I said NO! I’m dope…I’m dope. I went home to make some rice because it’s all I had to eat….as I’m pouring the rice in the pot, a jar from the cabinet falls and breaks into the pot of rice. I pick out the big pieces but mind you the little pieces are still in there, I literally ate glass that night. This sparked not only a fire but a fearlessness in me. About a week later, I went to the Big Daddy Kane concert on a mission to let Kane hear my beats. I tell the security that I’m one of Kane’s dancers. Security wasn’t having it. So as fate would have it, a fight broke out distracting security and so I ran. I didn’t know where I was running to, but I ran right into the back of Big Daddy Kane. I told him what I did and he listened to the beats. While he’s doing this, I can see security coming to get me. And in true Kane cool fashion. He gives this look to say, “Can’t you see he’s with me?” The very next day I’m in the studio with Kane and I’m officially in the music business. But let’s be clear…I’ve been homeless even two other times after that. I’ve made money, lost it, made it again. It was a clear lesson from God to stay humble. The Lord giveth and he taketh away.

SO: You and Jadakiss seem to have a trusting working relationship. How did that come about?

DD: I met Jadakiss through the actor Duane Martin. I did a song for a movie called Hustle and Heat. Duane Martin and Jadakiss both played in that movie, so through working together, we just kept building until eventually we ended up doing the song Letter To Big with Faith Evans which ended being the main song on the Biggie movie. But let me backtrack. I met Faith one night because I was hungry and I listened to my craving and went to Fat Burger. What I thought was a craving, was in fact that I was being guided by the vibrations. When I saw her, I told her about my studio, she came back and heard a couple tracks and that night I penned the hook to Letter To Big.

SO: What do you say to the theory that people sell their souls to get into the music industry?

DD: First of all, your soul is not for sale, so you can’t literally sell your soul. But I will say that when you go against who you are to gain some sort of stardom or unearned favor, you are then going against who you are morally and that’s why you see the heavy drugs and heavy drinking because some people in the industry have made deals that compromise who they were, so they drink to escape their now reality. You can be in this business without succumbing to the tricks of people trying to tap into your inner core of who you are. But thats why you have to operate on a high vibration so you can recognize and avoid that trap.

“When you link with demonic forces for superficial gain, you go against the will of God and that’s what selling your soul means to me.” -Duane DaRock

SO: Who’s responsible for how you ethically move throughout the music business and keep your integrity?

DD: HAHAHAHA make sure you put this in there. And put my laugh in big bold letter too. There so many artists today that wouldn’t have gotten where they are without the people they shitted on, pimped and played. A lot of ghost writers and ghost producers will never see the light of day. They receive no credit and are getting robbed regularly. But these are they same people responsible for the success you see in today’s artists. A lot of people at the top…stole their way to the top. There are a lot of wolves in this industry, but I consider myself a lion. A Lion moves gracefully and knows it rules that land. A Lion commands and takes what he wants when he is hungry. A wolf plots, plans and preys on anything weaker. A wolf is constantly looking to devour, a Lion attacks only when necessary .

SO: What’s your final word for today’s up and coming musicians?

DD: When you’re tapped in to your inner guidance, it will tell you what you need to do. Stop saying “I’m chasing my dreams.” If someone tells you to “Chase your dreams” smack the shit out of em. Anything you are chasing is obviously running away from you. The words you want to use is that I’m attracting my reality…I am manifesting my dreams. You’re talking about the guy that was homeless three times yet Kevin Hart used my song about struggle to be the main song for his movie. It can happen for you if you believe in yourself. I’m Duane DaRock and I stand by what I’ve said.

@DJLAYNELUV

@DuaneDaRock

@StraightOfficialMag

@StateOfHip_Hop

@FleetDJs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

read more

[FEATURE] David Banner: 601 comes to the 614 by DJ Layne Luv

David Banner Lecture Ohio

Sept 27th 2017, Jackson Mississippi rapper David Banner calls up 106.7fm The Beat in Columbus Ohio and receives some disturbing news. He was told that a rumor circulating the city was that he would more than likely not show up to the lecture event Speak Your Truth Summit. Shortly after the interview Mr. Banner went right to Instagram to confirm that he indeed was coming to our city and that he was proud to come to our town. Within that one minute video, you saw integrity, compassion and a deep rooted southern pride to always keep your word no matter what it costs. All qualities of being a real man.

If you have grown with David Banner like I have since the hit song Like A Pimp ft Lil Flip or major production credit on T.I.’s monumental album Trap Muzik (2003), then you know that the 2017 David Banner is not the same one we know from 2003. Of course David Banner always told well rounded stories, such as Cadillacs on 22’s referencing the death of Emmett Till and other misfortunes in his home state, but after 2006, we started to see a change and conviction in his approach to music. Maybe it was those Katrina waters of 2005 that destroyed his beloved state that brought about the enlightenment. Go back in time and remember how pissed he was when the world witnessed with it’s own eyes that the President of the United States George W. Bush didn’t give a damn about the poor and disfranchised in Florida, Mississippi, Texas and of course the city hit the worst New Orleans. This was his family that was suffering and he was the only voice fit to sound the alarm in the time period to speak about his state of emergency. (pun intended)

The Great Malcolm X said in his autobiography…once the light is turned on inside you cannot turn it off. Well Mr. Banner’s light continues to shine brighter and brighter as he brings awareness to the plight of being Black In America especially in the southern states. When Straight Official caught up with Banner…I had a lot on my mind. I was extremely perplexed. I witnessed and reposted the murder of Patrick Harmon of Salt Lake City Utah on my Uptown Weekly Instagram page. Not to mention being close to the case of Timothy Davis in Columbus Ohio. In that particular situation, by all means, we are grateful that young man is still alive. However, with strain and intensity in my eyes, I told Mr. Banner…”Sir, there’s a lot of people that don’t know….but I know you know….Please shed some light on how long we have to endure these horrendous acts in front of our face as we standby appearing to be helpless.”

Understand I come to piss people off and make them uncomfortable. Because pain brings about attention quickly. Listen, a warrant, smoking weed, running, none of that is justifiable in killing someone. I’m not just talking about black people. Whatever color they are, if they are not directly posing a threat to a police officer and they’re just running away, my friend there is no reason for anyone to get shot. See, white people have gotten black people to think like them, so when we see someone jammed up by the police, the first thing we think in the back of our mind is ..damn what that n***a do? Now unless that man (Harmon) was wanted for murder, then shooting him doesn’t make any sense. You see, we also have to stop echoing their bullshit media commentary, just like in the Kaepernick situation. They wanna say kneeling is a disrespect to our troops. Well, the last time I checked, America treats it’s troops like shit. So as I’ve said on many stages, the only way to get “the power’s” attention is either by the loss of money or the loss of life.”

I spoke with David Banner for about 15 more minutes, and then it was time for him to get whisked away to the stage for his lecture. As he stood before the crowd he commanded everyone to turn off their cell phones from going live at his show. His reasoning is that he feels African Americans already give away too much for free. “We have to start getting paid for our talents and gifts” he states. He also said in front a semi-light audience “If folks wanted the experience, they should have brought their ass to the show.”

He then passed out his CD #Godbox to the entire audience, and then had enough time to play snippets from two songs for the appreciative crowd. He proceeded to break down why conscious music may not sell the way mainstream music does. “One reason muh fuchas may not buy ya shit is cuz it ain’t jammin. Just because your music has a message in it doesn’t mean it should suck.” As he states that Godbox is one of the most important albums to hip hop in the history of it, only the keepers of this culture and art form can co-sign that prediction. And just as we saw of 4:44, #Godbox did not have the nightclubs in mind this go round, but instead another project to wake up the minds.

After the show, David Banner showed true southern hospitality and shook as many hands and took as many pictures as he could with those that had to wait patiently almost two hours for the rapper/producer to take the stage. And he also gave many kudos to the organizer of the event Ms. Tomiqua Perry for her hard work and determination. 

Lastly at David Banner’s request he wanted me to quote him saying “This is the first time I’m saying this to Black America on your article brother. Don’t be afraid, they are killing us anyway so continue to stand and speak out against injustice. They’ll kill you for obeying the law, (Philando Castile) so don’t be afraid. We have been so conditioned to be afraid of white people. I’ll say this for the first time too, most black people praise white people more than they’re own religion. They’ll cheat on their wife, kill another brother, lie, steal, do everything that bible told them not to do, but will not take a stand against wrong-doing white folks. Use that, don’t take that out, quote quote mutha fucha hahahaha. Because we have to address our conditioned mentality for change to  happen as well.”

Thank you Mr. Banner for coming to our city and opening up the minds to Speak Their Truth. And be sure to pick up #GodBox on all streaming outlets (iTunes Tidal, Spotify etc)

@DJLAYNELUV

@StraightOfficialMag

@DavidBannerLikesPictures

@Stateofhip_hop

@FleetDJs

 

read more

[Entertainment] SLUT WALK [AMBER ROSE] PRESENTS

SLUT

Los Angeles, CA – Amber Rose held her third annual SlutWalk Festival in Los Angeles over the weekend at Pershing Square and was accompanied by boyfriend/rapper 21 Savage.
Clad in a blonde wig and a Captain Save-A-Hoe costume, Rose posted a series of photos to social media during the event.
“Thank you for all of ur support today baby it means the world to me,” Rose wrote in the caption.

read more

[FEATURE] Dear Urban Immigrant Merchants: “An Open Letter by DJ Layne Luv”

Immigrant Merchant

Dear Urban Immigrant Merchants:

First of all let me start off by saying Congratulations! According to favorable statistics, you have overcome many obstacles to make it to the free world that they call the United States of America. Indeed there is great suffering all over this globe, so there is no telling what you and your family may have had to go through to establish residency in the US of A whether permanent or temporary. And of all things, you have not only made it to the land of opportunity, you have chosen what some may call the most riskiest of occupations. You have chosen to open a business in the urban community to sell your product and services to African Americans.

I commend you on your enterprising spirit, that you have carved a profitable way to provide for you and your family. However, your stereotypical behavior toward African Americans is where the relationship gets a little tricky. I need you to understand that the money you receive from urban neighborhoods is what causes your business to thrive. And before any particular ethnic group takes offense to this letter, let it be clear that I am addressing ALL urban immigrant merchants. Asian, African, Middle Eastern, Indian, Caribbean, and even including our Latin brothers and sisters and any other possible ethnic groups I left out. If you have opened your business doors to the public and you are accepting African American dollars, there are some things that need to be put On The Table. (pun intended)

While my views may not speak for the entire African American community, I know a lot of them share my sentiment. The grievance I have with you is the way we are sometimes treated by your culture. As if your relationship with us is only transactional. Yes we are aware, African American culture is THE highest consuming culture in the world. However, it has even been rumored by a few of YOUR brothers and sisters and told directly to me that, most times your culture is debriefed before you set up shop in the neighborhood (“hood”) that African Americans are rude, obnoxious, lazy people that don’t care about anything but making babies, looking good and getting high. You are told that by no means should you trust us. That if you turn your back AA’s will rob you blind. Not to mention, media portrayal, rap videos and hood movies don’t aid to dispel this belief. Sometimes you are even correct in your assumptions & belief in the ignorance that comes from people of the ghetto. However you take that “ghetto” money to put your children through private school and college. You use that “ghetto” money to establish living quarters and purchase property for as much family that you can bring to this country. You also use that “ghetto” money to send back to support your family in your home country.

I know I know! Shame on us for not opening up our own convenience store 30 plus years ago. Shame on us for not owning and controlling our own hair supply stores. Luckily we’ve started to in-house nail-techs in beauty salons and we still for the most part control that and barbershops, but shame on us yet and still because we don’t own the building which means money is still flowing out to other cultures hands.

Yet after you’ve made a living from the community you snub your nose at….this is a true story I witnessed. 3 African American children come into the convenience store. I was in the store with my two friends. We were getting keys made because we just inked a deal to merge three businesses…I digress. Anyway, the owner (Indian decent) yells at the children. “One at a time! Only one child in my store at a time! Only one can go and get what you need, you other two have to stand by the door so that I can keep my eyes on all of you” (I swear I can’t make this shit up) The owner then turns to us three gentleman and says to us “I know they are going to steal” and proceeded to give the nod of approval like we were going to agree with this racial discrimination. I got so pissed I left my friends at the counter saying “I don’t have time for his bullshit today.”

In the past three years I’ve seen immigrant merchants call the police on people that regularly patronize your store. One case in particular is the case of Eric Garner from Staten Island NY that lost his life for allegedly selling “loosies” in front of the convenience store. But this last case right here in my hometown of Columbus Ohio took the cake for me. The brutal beating of Timothy Davis in a Columbus Ohio convenience store was appalling. Even after all the video and articles I’ve read, I’m still not educated to speak thoroughly about this case. But what I did witness was either the owner or storekeeper looking on as if Mr. Davis deserved the punishment he was receiving by Columbus Police. The storekeeper even went as far as trying to aid the police cover up their horrendous behavior by telling the bystander to turn off the phone camera. The owner continues to look on as Mr. Davis’s clothes is being stripped from his body and being beaten mercilessly. It is obvious that the owner does not care that this is someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s nephew, someone’s cousin. All you see is a man that is not profitable to you so you don’t care what happens to him.

I remember in 1993 how accurate it was to see these stereotypes being played out on the big screen in Menace II Society. At the very beginning of that movie, the store owner and his wife suspiciously and overtly monitor Kane & O-Dog’s every move. The store owner and his wife are robbed and killed by O-Dog (Lorenz Tate) for his offensive remark “I feel sorry for your mother.” The movie resonated with me because I too have been followed around a corner store. I have been spoken rudely to by an immigrant merchant simply because I wanted to return an item. Needless to say, I never stepped foot in those places again.

I’m writing this letter hoping it will spark a change on both sides. You have to understand Mr. or Mrs. immigrant merchant, the government plays a large part in ”ghetto” behavior. Yes! I too have seen plenty of ignorant shit happen in your stores. Half of the shit I wouldn’t put up with as an owner. But there is a story behind the story in regards to ghetto behavior. A number of urban African Americans live in places called the “projects” which is sometimes what it is..an animalistic “project” filled with rapists, drug dealers and killers. But you have to understand GOOD people are being raised in those same projects and they are annoyed by the same element you are annoyed by. As Tupac Shakur says…”The same thing you fear…We fear..except we live next door to the killer” I also feel that some urban people are the product of poor public education and ill indoctrination. One would even have to consider surviving continual trauma can bring about the high rate of mental illness in the hood. However humanism still has to come into play at some point. You must realize you are making a living off of PEOPLE and that deserves and ounce of respect. Don’t judge people from the ghetto. They’ve been through a lot, and survival is sometimes the only thing they know how to do. I’m not saying to be a sucker. What I’m encouraging is for you to show some compassion. Show some empathy.

Because the scary part is that African Americans are waking up. We now know that if we can be President of The United States scandal free…We can do anything we want…including put you out of business and do for ourselves. No obstacle is too great that we can’t network with import and export companies and demand that companies respect the needs of our community and treat us with the respect we deserve. We know that we are America’s biggest consumers, and it’s time we got a piece of that pie (Thank you Jay-Z 4:44) . …and by the way..we’re not asking anymore, we’re just doing it (Word 2 Nike). We may not be able to control the economy as a whole, but bit by bit, we can put people in office and hold them accountable for the promises they made to the African American community. Look around you, a new black business is opening up everyday. And a lot of it is not only because of conventional lending but through creative financing as well. And if we start opening up beauty supply stores or successful carryouts right next to yours, where do you think we’re going to spend our money? A merchant that allows us to get beat by wicked police, and speaks to us rudely? Or someone that knows the plight of being black in America and treats us with love & respect? Think About It…..

Sincerely,

A person that has had enough of the bullshit.

@DJLAYNELUV

@StraightOfficialMag

@FleetDJs

read more

[INTERVIEW] Janiro Hawkins Co-owner of “The Southern Entertainment Awards: Sets The Record Straight

SEA2018_cruise

Latoya:(SOM) Thank you for taking the time out to answer a few questions for us regarding the SEA’s.  With the upcoming nominations being released and some people taking to social media to vent their frustrations, it would be a good time to really help them understand how this long running award ceremony works  and operates. I’ll jump right into it…Can you explain to the people what the SEA’s are, who owns/operates the ceremony with you, how long you have been doing it, and what AREA’S that the SEA’s cover?

 

 

Janiro: Jesse “Dj Infamous” and myself founded the Southern Entertainment Awards back in 2001 in Nashville, TN.  Our event is designed to cover all states in the South as well as individuals making noise in the South as well.  It is not limited to just one city, state or county.

 

 

Latoya:(SOM) What prompted you to create the awards and what is your position/involvement in the Music and Entertainment Industry outside of this, if any?

 

 

Janiro: Prior to creating the SEAs we owned and operated a local record store (Platinum Bound Records) in the heart of Nashville on Jefferson St. and saw a void and disconnect within the independent music scene as a whole.  We looked at the impact of the DJ and the lack of recognition artists were receiving and sought to make a difference.

 

 

Latoya (SOM): Start off by explaining the nomination process: the personal involvement of owners, how ballot is selected, qualifications to be on the ballot…

 

 

 

Janiro: We’ve maintained the same nomination/voting process for the past decade which is as follows.  Annually from May 1st – August, we have a blank ballot on our website for people to fill out.  At the end of that period, we tally up all of the nominations received to create the ballot.  The ballot is created by taking the top 15 individuals (by # of nominations received) in each category.  While there is no perfect way to conduct this process in any event, we feel that by doing it this way, this leaves the process totally up to those who go online and take the time out to fill out a ballot and out of our hands.  Does everyone who wants to be on the ballot get on it?  No, not at all and that is primarily because people all have different fan bases and each individual interacts differently with their own fan base.

 

 

 

Latoya (SOM): What dates do you typically run nominations from and what type of advertising is used to notify people that it is going on?

 

 

 

Janiro:  We promote and encourage people to go nominate their favorites in any category throughout the entire year whether it be in person, on panels, at various events, on social media and more.  Over the years we’ve run radio ads, placed magazine ads and even generated tv commercials, but when you’re covering over 13 states, it makes it virtually impossible to cover ever nook and cranny.

 

 

Latoya (SOM): What is the requirements of the nominees? Do they have to attend award shows, sell a portion of tickets, ect?

 

 

Janiro: In regards to requirements of those nominated, all we ask is that they let people know they’re nominated.  In the event that they’re unable to attend and they win, we mail their trophy to them at no cost.  No ticket sales are required, matter of fact, the upcoming 15th Annual Southern Ent Awards is FREE for anyone to attend, all they have to do is come take a vacation with us to Key West and Cozumel aboard our cruise with Carnival.

 

 

Latoya:(SOM) Once the ballot is dropped it seems that you have group of nominees who are happy and those that aren’t.  How do you address concerns that arise regarding the ballot selection?  Have you ever considered posting voting numbers to see how many people voted for who so there is no confusion on why someone got nominated and someone else didn’t?

 

Janiro: To anyone that has a concern, we open our doors to answer questions the best we can.  What typically ends up happening though is that these questions and concerns are always after the fact vs. prior to or during.  Those who opt not to ask, we can only continue to say that “we’re here, so inquire.”  Posting the numbers may do more harm than help because it’s truly lack of education of the process that causes the disconnect.

 

Latoya:(SOM) What is your advice for those that don’t necessarily know how to get themselves nominated? What steps do you encourage them to take to get themselves there?

 

Janiro: I advise them to do their due diligence and inquire to gain understanding instead of assuming.  We can be reached at: southernentawardsstaff@gmail.com and welcome any and all professional inquiries.

 

Latoya:(SOM) Why are these types of platforms important for people in the Music and Entertainment Industry?

 

Janiro: They stimulate growth, conversation and action while bringing people together to network and celebrate.  It is vital that we support platforms created by and for the hardworking individuals who take resources from the full time jobs to fund their passion.

 

Latoya: (SOM) When are the upcoming up Southern Ent Awards and how can people contact you?

 

Janiro: 15th Annual Southern Ent Awards (flyer attached) Social: @sea_awards  Email: southernentawardsstaff@gmail.com Bus 615.669.0012 Web: www.southernentawards.com

read more

The Incredible Effect Of Caffeine, How Coffee Rewrite Your Brain

coffee-869203_1920

Was certainty sing remaining along how dare dad apply discover only. Settled opinion how enjoy so shy joy greater one. No properly day fat surprise and interest nor adapted replying she love. Bore tall nay too into many time expenses . Doubtful for answered yet less indulged margaret her post shutters together. Ladies many wholly around whence.

Kindness to he horrible reserved ye. Effect twenty indeed beyond for not had county. Them to him without greatly can private. Increasing it unpleasant no of contrasted no continue. Nothing my colonel no removed in weather. It dissimilar in up devonshire inhabiting.

read more

Digital Photos: 20 Tips Can Help Save Your Stories, Memory and Life

Was certainty sing remaining along how dare dad apply discover only. Settled opinion how enjoy so shy joy greater one. No properly day fat surprise and interest nor adapted replying she love. Bore tall nay too into many time expenses . Doubtful for answered yet less indulged margaret her post shutters together. Ladies many wholly around whence.

Kindness to he horrible reserved ye. Effect twenty indeed beyond for not had county. Them to him without greatly can private. Increasing it unpleasant no of contrasted no continue. Nothing my colonel no removed in weather. It dissimilar in up devonshire inhabiting.

read more

10 Books That Everyone Should Read At Least Once In Their Lives

person-woman-relaxation-girl

Was certainty sing remaining along how dare dad apply discover only. Settled opinion how enjoy so shy joy greater one. No properly day fat surprise and interest nor adapted replying she love. Bore tall nay too into many time expenses . Doubtful for answered yet less indulged margaret her post shutters together. Ladies many wholly around whence.

Kindness to he horrible reserved ye. Effect twenty indeed beyond for not had county. Them to him without greatly can private. Increasing it unpleasant no of contrasted no continue. Nothing my colonel no removed in weather. It dissimilar in up devonshire inhabiting.

read more

Camera Review: Old Vintage Film For The Love Of Taking Photos

kaboodmpics
8tech score

Was certainty sing remaining along how dare dad apply discover only. Settled opinion how enjoy so shy joy greater one. No properly day fat surprise and interest nor adapted replying she love. Bore tall nay too into many time expenses . Doubtful for answered yet less indulged margaret her post shutters together. Ladies many wholly around whence.

Kindness to he horrible reserved ye. Effect twenty indeed beyond for not had county. Them to him without greatly can private. Increasing it unpleasant no of contrasted no continue. Nothing my colonel no removed in weather. It dissimilar in up devonshire inhabiting.

read more